Great LDS Review of Critical Books by Catholic Author

Going through my library, I found my copy of the book “Inside Mormonism: What Mormons Really Believe” by Isaiah Bennett, a Catholic priest that converted to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and then converted back to the Catholic faith.  I was browsing through it when I found many clear errors and misrepresentations of LDS beliefs.  The Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship, an LDS scholarly apologetic organization at Brigham Young University, has a review of this book (and his other book, “When Mormons Call: Answering Mormon Missionaries at Your Door”) by Barry Bickmore, author of the book “Restoring the Ancient Church: Joseph Smith and Early Christianity“, an excellent book tying unique LDS beliefs to ancient Judaism and Christianity.

I found his review to be quite helpful in articulating why this book really doesn’t present any arguments that Latter-day Saint apologists are not familiar with, and indeed presents arguments that have been decisively addressed.  I especially enjoyed how Bickmore demonstrates the presence of a number of unique LDS beliefs in the writings of various Early Church Fathers, early Christians that Catholic apologists are of course familiar with (and I can already hear the automatic response from them-“they are taken out of context!!!”).  His review can be read here.  I was particularly amused by this section near the beginning of the review-

“Karl Keating,
director and founder of Catholic Answers, writes the following regarding
Loraine Boettner’s book, Roman Catholicism, which relies
heavily on the testimony of former priests to establish “what Catholics
really believe”:
These are the books—written by disaffected ex-Catholics or
by people who never have been Catholic but who have made
their mark in the world by pushing unadorned bigotry—
from which Boettner gets his juiciest information. Relying
on them for the straight story on the Catholic Church is like
relying on a political candidate to tell you all the good points
about his opponent. . . .Now it may well be that a man leaving one religion for
another can write fairly, without bitterness, about the one he
left behind. . . . But it stands to reason that most people who
suddenly think they have an urge to write about their change
of beliefs just want to vent their frustrations or justify their
actions. Their books should be read and used with discretion,
and they should not be used at all as explanations of the
beliefs of their old religion if the books betray the least hint
of rancor.2
It is my hope that the reader will apply the same standard when assessing
Bennett’s writings.”

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